Carbon monoxide alarms santa clarita

Carbon Monoxide Alarms in Santa Clarita

There are a great many changes in the codes and standards for Carbon monoxide alarms, even as a contractor it’s difficult to keep up.  but what do you the home owner need to know about carbon monoxide alarms in the city of Santa Clarita? Well, we aim to clear up the great carbon monoxide debate and give it to you in plain english.

What is carbon Monoxide?

Carbon Monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas that is produced from different types of heaters, fireplaces, furnaces, and many types of appliances and cooking devices. It can also be produced from vehicles that are idling.

Are carbon monoxide detectors required?

In accordance with SB 183 and the California Carbon Monoxide Prevention Act of 2010 the law states that CO detectors must be installed in every “dwelling unit intended for occupancy”

The term dwelling unit as defined means the following:

 “Dwelling unit intended for human occupancy” means a single-family dwelling, factory-built home as defined in Section 19971, duplex, lodging house, dormitory, hotel, motel, condominium, stock cooperative, time-share project, or dwelling unit in a multiple-unit dwelling unit building or buildings. “Dwelling unit intended for human occupancy” does not mean a property owned or leased by the state, the Regents of the University of California, or a local governmental agency.

Questions and Answers according to SB 183 & NFPA 720

A device designed to detect carbon monoxide and produce a distinct, audible alarm.
It’s a device that is battery powered, a plug-in device with battery backup, or a device installed as recommended by Standard 720 of the National Fire Protection Association that is either wired into the alternating current power line of the dwelling unit with a secondary battery backup or connected to a system via a panel.
An owner of a dwelling unit intended for human occupancy shall install a carbon monoxide device, approved and listed by the State Fire Marshal pursuant to Section 13263, in each existing dwelling unit having a fossil fuel burning heater or appliance, fireplace, or an attached garage, within the earliest applicable time period as follows: (1) For all existing single-family dwelling units intended for human occupancy on or before July 1, 2011. (2) For all other existing dwelling units intended for human occupancy on or before January 1, 2013. (b) With respect to the number and placement of carbon monoxide devices, an owner shall install the devices in a manner consistent with building standards applicable to new construction for the relevant type of occupancy or with the manufacturer’s instructions, if it is technically feasible to do so.

HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE Section 17926. (a) An owner of a dwelling unit intended for human occupancy shall install a carbon monoxide device, approved and listed by the State Fire Marshal pursuant to Section 13263, in each existing dwelling unit having a fossil fuel burning heater or appliance, fireplace, or an attached garage, within the earliest applicable time period as follows: (1) For all existing single-family dwelling units intended for human occupancy on or before July 1, 2011.  (2) For all existing hotel and motel dwelling units intended for human occupancy on or before January 1, 2017. (3) For all other existing dwelling units intended for human occupancy on or before January 1, 2013.

Yes. A violation of this section is an infraction punishable by a maximum fine of two hundred dollars ($200) for each offense. Notwithstanding paragraph (1), a property owner shall receive a 30-day notice to correct. If an owner receiving notice fails to correct within that time period, the owner may be assessed the fine pursuant to paragraph (2).
An owner or owner’s agent of a dwelling unit intended for human occupancy who rents or leases the dwelling unit to a tenant shall maintain carbon monoxide devices in that dwelling unit consistent with this section and Section 17926.The carbon monoxide device shall be operable at the time that the tenant takes possession. A tenant shall be responsible for notifying the owner or owner’s agent if the tenant becomes aware of an inoperable or deficient carbon monoxide device within his or her unit. The owner or owner’s agent shall correct any reported deficiencies or inoperabilities in the carbon monoxide device.
If you sell your house, the replacement of the CO detectors may be a disclosure issue and not required as part of the real estate transaction, however, the law is still in affect and therefore required in accordance with SB 185 and / or your local building code requirements.
According to the NFPA 720 9.4.1.1* Carbon monoxide alarms or detectors shall be installed as follows: (1)Outside of each separate dwelling unit sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms (2)On every occupiable level of a dwelling unit, including basements, excluding attics and crawl spaces (3)Other locations where required by applicable laws, codes, or standards
No. Co and oxygen are very similar in weight. Im sure that if there was such a significant difference the NFPA among others would recognize this and make standards accordingly. NFPA 720 9.4.1.2* Each alarm or detector shall be located on the wall, ceiling, or other location as specified in the manufacturer’s published instructions that accompany the unit. That means despite what you’ve been told, they get installed in accordance with the manufactures specifications. Not up high… Not down low… Not in the middle, but wherever the manufacture says they get installed. And they may very well be in the middle, up high or down low.
Multipurpose CO and smoke alarms must emit an alarm or voice warning in a manner that clearly differentiates between a carbon monoxide alarm warning and a smoke detector warning. 9.6.3.1 A fire alarm signal shall take precedence and be distinctively recognizable over any other signal, even when the nonfire signal is initiated first. 9.6.3.2 Distinctively different audible alarm signals shall be provided for each of the following: (1)Fire alarms  (2)Carbon monoxide alarms (3)Other alarms
9.6.4 Interconnection of Alarms. When two or more alarms are installed within a dwelling unit, suite of rooms, or similar area, they shall be arranged so that the operation of any alarm causes all alarms within these locations to sound. Exception: Alarms installed in existing construction shall not be required to cause all alarms to sound.

So to summarize, carbon monoxide detectors are required by law and should therefore be installed in accordance with this law.